Tag Archives: OOH

Trish Guilford gears up for a new role at OMC

With over 25 years of experience and involvement in the media industry, Trish Guilford has recently been named as the new General Manager of the Out of Home Measurement Council (OMC).

For the last three years, Trish has been consulting and freelancing in addition to being in a partnership with VML South Africa – developing their integrated media offering. She has worked on numerous key clients focusing on writing strategies and implementation over the years, and has been considerably involved in the industry having formerly been a lecturer at both the AAA School of Advertising and Boston Media House. She is a member of the Advertising Media Forum and has previously served on the AMASA (Advertising Media Association of South Africa) committee.

“Out of Home advertising is an exciting industry and I am looking forward to driving the OOH currency to improve accountability and measurability of OOH formats. After so many years in the media industry, I believe that this opportunity will allow me to give back to an industry which has been good to me for over two decades”, Trish said.

In essence, the OMC produces comprehensive research covering the key OOH areas through its valuable Roadside Outdoor Audience Data (ROAD). Explaining the significance of this research, Trish added, “With the current industry research changes, we have a golden opportunity to position OOH as a media type that has robust research and the OOH industry can now be accountable for the impact that the medium brings to a campaign”.

Dave Roberts, the CEO of Primedia Outdoor, strongly gave Trish a vote of confidence, “We look forward to embarking on this journey with Trish in revolutionalising the OOH industry over the coming years and she will undoubtedly play a key role in advising both media owners and media agencies to formulate solid arguments for OOH opportunities to clients”.


The Marketing Kraal Assists Nkukhu-Box Chicken Bring Flavour to Kasi

Outdoor Advertising and Media Company, Marketing Kraal is assisting Nkukhu-Box CHICKEN to create awareness about the new Grilled Chicken brand in the townships.


Utilising their cost-effective wall murals advertising media platform, the advertising campaign intends to create brand awareness and market share growth.

Nkukhu-Box is a home of grilled chicken embracing Kasi “township” flavours and lifestyle. The first Nkukhu-Box store was launched in Mamelodi West in July 2016 according to CEO Itumeleng Mpatlanyana. The store concept is made from specially designed shipping containers, making it cost-effective and movable in around township spaces. There are currently stores in Mamelodi,Shoshanguve,Atteridgeville and Jouberton Klerksdorp.

We are honoured to be working with Nkukhu-Box on this exciting marketing campaign, says Lebona Moleli, Founder and CEO of The Marketing Kraal. We are not only in the business of advertising and marketing but we also support entrepreneurship in line with our core values of innovation and wealth creation, concludes Lebona.


Theodore Buscemi, from Posterscope Australia, explains why marketers shouldn’t look past OOH to control how their brand appears in market.

In this guest piece, Posterscope business executive Theodore Buscemi (pictured above) explains why marketers shouldn’t look past the out-of-home media channel to control how their brand appears in market.

The ad industry never fails to breed controversy. Like a hot summer sun and dry dead grass, it is just a spark away from a full-blown firestorm.

Digital is stealing all the attention these days – everything from fat-fingers and ad fraud to flawed metrics and evil algorithms. Not to mention the proliferation of fake news, which has garnered widespread attention since the 2016 US presidential election cycle.

Meanwhile, giants like Facebook and Google suffered as a result of the recent online video debacles. These issues went beyond financial implications of misspent marketing dollars – brand image itself was the real victim. And when a brand entrusts Google with a portion of its marketing spend, it is Google’s responsibility to protect the brand image of the client.

Why is it so important for brands to consider where and how they are represented in market?

As Scott Goodson, author of UpRising and founder of global cultural movement firm StrawberryFrog, puts it: “Products have life cycles; brands outlive products”.

Brand is power. It represents a company; its products, services, and the value code it operates by. Brand is trust. It is reputation. It has its own intrinsic value. Brands take years to build and can be crippled overnight.

Pepsi’s recent campaign fail illustrates this well. By numbers alone, the campaign did great. It received global attention with plenty of video views, comments and social amplification. This, of course, is not the full story. Widespread backlash damaged the brand and alienated the very audience the campaign aimed to engage.

Once a campaign is released into the wild, it is anyone’s guess how the public will respond. McDonald’s also saw this firsthand after pulling an ad using a child’s grief for his dead father to tell a brand story.

So, how do clients exert some control over how their brand is viewed in market? Well this is where the power of out-of-home media comes into play.

Attribution and ROI measurement is increasingly more important to clients, and digital channels provide strong metrics in this area. However, it is crucial that clients don’t just look at media channels through this lens – particularly out-of-home.

Out-of-home traditionally hasn’t been used in this way, though there are new tools and technologies being developed to illustrate the medium’s role in the conversion process.

One of out-of-home’s greatest strengths is its role in creating impact and awareness. Don’t just think about static billboards here – think about the new, dynamic, digital out-of-home technologies helping brands tell more engaging stories.

Out-of-home media also has the ultimate trump card up its sleeve: it can’t be switched off. Unlike other media, consumers can’t avoid out-of-home. There are no out-of-home ad blockers.

As such, out-of-home gives the client maximum control over where and how ads are displayed. The promise of control in digital media has proven difficult across content-rich platforms like Facebook and YouTube. Out-of-home doesn’t face these complexities.

What this means for clients is greater power to align brands with an audience or environment that enhances its image. Premium clients can target affluent audiences in c-suite office towers, and brands rooted in family values can play in retail and entertainment spaces where the risk of appearing alongside offensive content is almost zero.

Sales are crucial, conversion is key, but brand is power and needs protecting. So, take back that power and use out-of-home to control how your brand appears in market.


The Critical Role of Out-of-Home in the Marketing Mix.

With almost two-thirds of all consumer purchases made within half an hour of being exposed to Out-of-Home advertising, it’s time to revisit the critical role the medium plays in the broader marketing mix. Roadside Outdoor Audience Data (ROAD) now provides rich data on the consumption and impact of billboards, and integrated with other media stats allows brands to further craft effective, integrated campaigns. OOH should play a key role in this space, argues Howard Lonstein, Marketing Manager for Outdoor Network. 

When it’s possible to map the customer journey in intimate detail (turning on the TV over breakfast, passing billboards driving to work, surfing the web during the lunch hour, paging through a magazine at the dentist, listening to the radio on the way to gym), thanks to social listening tools and other data sources, it’s clear that marketing is entering a new era. Knowing where consumers go, what they pay attention to, what they need and where they shop gives us unique insight into how to reach them, and how we can customise messages to engage them in the most relevant way as they go about their day-to-day business. This makes media placement easier – and it also changes our approach to OOH enormously.

Harvard Business Review says the days of treating advertising touch points as if each works in isolation is long past and marketers should ask themselves which combinations of ad exposures work best to influence customers. Think static OOH doesn’t speak to smartphone-clutching millennials? A recent study of 1 837 smartphone users by the Outdoor Advertising Association of America found that OOH media is especially effective at reaching consumers before they search or shop online, while geo-fencing can work seamlessly with out-of-home formats to target consumers in a particular area. The context within which a consumer is exposed to brand communication becomes even more important as the clutter increases. The right message, at the right time, directed at the right consumer results in greater impact and ultimately in action being taken. Marketing Week has predicted that incorporating cellphone connectivity with OOH will become the norm, not a ‘special’ part of a campaign, and it’s hard to disagree. Remember that a customer can be ‘switched on’ at any time during the consumer journey – even stepping out from work to grab a sandwich.

It would be perverse to ignore the role OOH and impact can play in a campaign. It is commonly accepted now that OOH provides great frequency, which is a key driver in priming awareness for campaigns. This is particularly true in terms of digital platforms which reduce the CTP for the overall campaign, providing greater value for advertisers and brands. It is imperative that brands are exposed to these facts and the benefits that are derived when OOH is part of a broad campaign. It is worth noting that the OOH industry in the US recently reported its seventh consecutive year of revenue growth, with a more than 15% increase in 2016 from the previous year, according to The Outdoor Media Association – this reflects a global trend.  


Apple expanded its ‘Shot on iPhone 6’ print ad campaign by displaying 162 photos taken by iPhone 6 users (not professional photographers) on giant billboards in 73 cities across 25 countries, along with a 30-second TV ad and videos. Having photos blown up to billboard size gave a good idea of the power of the product without having to spell it out (less is always more on billboards), plus the scale was an ideal showcase for an ‘art gallery’ of images. OOH amplified Apple’s message and achieved enormous reach – the billboards received 6.5 billion media impressions and 255 million online impressions.

Coca-Cola has always loved multichannel marketing. The 23 000-pound ‘drinkable billboard’ it rolled out shot soda through a straw into a drinking fountain, complementing interactive TV commercials and downloadable coupons available from mall kiosks – in this way, it created a brand experience on a large scale, gaining traction via OOH, experiential, digital, social and broadcast channels. It was also vital in terms of increasing social media engagement.

Big brands know the value of high-impact, in-your-face media, but even smaller brands know that OOH delivers. A recent Posterscope US study showed that you can increase reach by as much as 303% if you add billboards to a mobile app and web campaign. Adding OOH to internet ads increases retention by two days, according to research conducted by Brand Science. A billboard can drive online research about a product and lead to online purchases, for example. In South Africa, radio and TV are hugely popular, but younger generations demand a brand experience that talks to them across different channels (and less traditional channels) – something that media planners need to take into account. The Brand Science study shows that ad retention of media one week after seeing an ad is 55% for OOH as against 49% for print and 35% for radio – and 58% of people report consciously looking at OOH ads, which is a higher rate of engagement than other forms of advertising can provide.

Seamlessly integrating OOH into your campaign can help to drive campaign objectives. OOH is a crucial touchpoint because it is so good at engaging with consumers in a way that builds relationships with brands; in fact, when used alongside above-the-line advertising, OOH has been found to play a crucial role in long-term brand-building. By leverage OOH in your campaign, you can reach more people more often, target the consumers most likely to be interested in your brand, drive consumer action, and optimise reach and frequency at a relatively low cost. All this points to a high return on investment, which is a prime consideration in today’s tough market.